Black Currant Jam

black currant jam
This weekend we picked the last of the black currants. It seems the best method of picking and the time-consuming ‘topping and tailing’ of the berries is to let your mother-in-law do most of the work. We ended up with about four pounds of them. While she worked I offered encouragement, assuming that negative reinforcement wouldn’t work in a family situation. I joke; I helped. I did get tired of the topping and tailing though. This would be a really easy task with a bunch of people and some good gossip. Proof that preserving deserves a party.
The jam was violently red while boiling away, and then turned a satisfying black.
Ingredients:
  • 1.8 kg (4 lbs) blackcurrants
  • 2 ½ cups white sugar
  • pint or so of water

Equipment:

  • large, heavy-bottomed pan
  • 6 jam jars
  • cookie sheet
  • ladle or jam funnel

Decant blackcurrants into a heavy-bottomed pan that will allow for evaporation. Add water to about half the level of the berries; they will cook down. Add sugar. Cook whole business down until it is pretty thick—we left a little bit of syrup so that the fruit would have a little suspension. In the meantime, wash jars and lids in soapy water. Sterilize the lids by dipping them in boiling water and allowing them to air dry. Sterilize the jars by placing them (opening up) on a cookie sheet covered in paper towels, and allowing to dry in an oven set to 160°C / 320°F.

black currant jam jar

When the jam is at a consistency that you’re happy with—highly reduced but still wet—carefully spoon it into the sterilized jars, making sure that there are no air bubbles among the fruit. Put on their lids and allow them to cool. As they cool, they will vacuum seal. If you have any doubt at all when you open the jars months later, or if they smell at all odd, throw it away! There’s no shame. There is shame in killing yourself by jam though.

Make sure to bring some jam to work to share and brag about, omitting any mention of how easy this is.